Tuesday, April 30, 2013



by Sharon Flake

Autumn and Adonis have nothing in common and everything in common. Autumn is outgoing and has lots of friends. Adonis is shy and not so eager to connect with people. But even with their differences, the two have one thing in common--they're each dealing with a handicap. For Autumn, who has a learning disability, reading is a painful struggle that makes it hard to focus in class. But as her school’s most aggressive team wrestler, Autumn can take down any problem. Adonis is confined to a wheelchair. He has no legs. He can't walk or dance. But he’s a strong reader who loves books. Even so, Adonis has a secret he knows someone like Autumn can heal.

In time, Autumn and Adonis are forced to see that our greatest weaknesses can turn into the assets that forever change us and those we love. (description from

I actually was not that fond of this book. 

 While I liked the fact that Autumn liked Adonis and didn't care at all that he's in a wheelchair, Adonis was pretty much a jerk through the whole book. Even when he comes to appreciate her for who she is, he still wants to keep it a secret that he likes her. No girl should have to settle for that. 

 I also had a hard time reading this book in Autumn's voice, because I kept correcting her speech in my head (example - she would say "I don't read good and teacher keep pushin'" and in my head I would read the sentence then replay it in my head as "I can't read that well and my teacher keeps pushing me to try harder."). It just became exhausting. Ugh.

Not on my recommended list.

Full disclosure: Borrowed through interlibrary loan

1 comment:

  1. I understand, I did the same thing with the book Monster. It was a great book and won the Printz (I think) award in I think 2000, but I can't help but correct grammatical errors in my mind.